Armor Bearers

Q. I am an Armor Bearer for my pastor. He told me some things he did while serving as an Armor Bearer to his pastor, like going to wash his car on the weekends, getting up in the middle of the night to go serve him out of town while at other ministries, driving him all around town for different speaking engagements, dropping all of his plans to accommodate him if he has a last minute speaking engagement. Since he is a pastor now, I’m supposed to do all of these things for him. Don’t get me wrong, I try to serve as unto the Lord, but I don’t know if these things are necessarily considered “serving”.

A. The term armor bearer is found in the Old Testament only. Armor bearers were officers selected by kings and generals because of their bravery, not only to bear their armor, but also to stand by them in the time of danger. In modern times kings and generals have adjutants, who are the military equivalent to the administrative assistants to business leaders in civilian life. Far from being servants, they’re usually well compensated, trusted individuals who exercise considerable authority on their superior’s behalf.

The reason you won’t find armor bearers mentioned in the New Testament Church is because Pastors are not supposed to be equivalent to kings or generals, or business leaders. We’re supposed to be servants, not have servants (Mark 9:35).

I think your pastor was treated improperly when he was an “armor bearer”, but that’s no excuse for doing the same to you.

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