Re-interpreting The Nephilim?

Q. I am curious how you interpret “Men of Renown and Heroes of Old,” to be something bad, evil or wrong? In your writing you make a long jump taking the reader by the hand to simply accept that these Nephilim were indeed “fallen angels.”

Earlier in your article you attempt to validate and support your position, yet you side step this very process when you boldly announce (as so many other writers have) that the Nephilim are simply fallen angels. You are asking the reader to accept an idea that lacks support & validation. And indeed, seeing the Nephilim and evil fallen angels is popular sentiment related to this verse.

To me when reading the chapter I find this to be in great contrast to the luminary praise that comes to mind when reading; They were the heroes of old and men of renown. This strikes in me a very positive cord. How can a hero be a savage murderer? And no culture would label someone so unless he/she were good.

What if the Nephilim were actually not disobedient or fallen angels? What if they were good, noble and holy and were instructed to care for, instruct, heal, teach and mate with the daughters of men (women)?

We must always study the language for it leaves clues to the real meaning.

A. The phrase from Genesis 6:4 is actually mighty men, men of renown. You’re using a translation that’s inconsistent with the original language. The Hebrew word for mighty is never translated hero in the Bible. It comes from a root meaning strong or powerful. The word translated renown simply means to have a reputation. In Hebrew the phrase means something like “men with reputations of being strong and powerful”.

The Hebrew phrase sons of God is b’nai haElohim and is overwhelmingly translated angels. The word nephilim, sometimes translated giants, means fallen ones.

Both Peter (2 Peter 2:4) and Jude (Jude 1:6) say that these fallen angels are being held in chains for judgment.

For most of the history of mankind the view of Genesis 6:4 has been that angels disobeyed God and mated with human women producing offspring that were powerful giants opposed to God’s will. I don’t know where you got the idea that “they were good, noble and holy and were instructed to care for, instruct, heal, teach and mate with the daughters of men (women)”

Of the two views, mine is more consistent with both historical and Biblical opinion.

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