Speaking Grace To The Mountain

Q. I have a question concerning Grace. Is it possible or is there a scripture that says we can speak Grace to the mountain? The mountain being sickness, prosperity, problems, etc.
In our church service on Sunday we were told we could speak Grace to the mountain. There was no scripture reference. Can you help me with this?

A. Speaking grace to the mountain comes from the King James translation of Zechariah 4:7, which says, “Who art thou, O great mountain? Before Zerubbabel thou shalt become a plain: and he shall bring forth the headstone thereof with shoutings, crying, Grace, grace unto it.”

The Israelites had become discouraged because of all the interference they encountered when trying to build the 2nd Temple following their return from Babylon. In the context of the passage the great mountain symbolized the enormous task of building the Temple. In Zechariah 4:6 the Lord had said, “Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit” meaning they should trust Him to help them instead of trying to do it in their own strength.

To help them visualize the difference trusting Him would make, the Lord said it would be like turning a great mountain into a level plain. And when Zechariah brought out the top most stone, signifying that the task of building the Temple was completed the people would shout, “Grace, grace unto it” (not “Grace” to it). It would be an expression of joy that in the Lord’s strength they had completed a task they had thought to be impossible. It was similar to shouting “God bless it.”

I’ve always thought that a more appropriate invocation when faced with a seemingly impossible task is Zechariah 4:6, “Not by might, nor by power, but by my spirit, says the Lord” because in His strength all things become possible. Phil 4:13 is another one, “I can do everything through Him who gives me strength”. I see Zechariah 4:7 more as a celebratory exclamation upon its completion.

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